Cancelling an Interview by Tyler Pearl

Getting an interview can be tough. Typically less than 30% of candidates who are submitted or apply for a position make it to the interview stage. It comes as a shock to the hiring manager and recruiter when they invite a great candidate to interview and he or she doesn’t show up or cancels 20 minutes before. As a candidate, maybe not every interview is the one, but there are ways to cancel and be professional at the same time.

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The interview is the best time to fully understand the job opportunity and feel out the relationship with the company. The hiring manager saw something in your resume that peeked interest and has set aside time in their busy day to meet with you. Your recruiter has also put a lot of work into setting up the interview for you and preparing you. You took the time to talk with the recruiter and learn about the job. So why would you cancel now?

I understand that things come up. Maybe a more appealing opportunity has presented itself. Maybe you aren’t feeling well. Or perhaps you had forgotten your schedule. If canceling even starts to cross your mind, consider what you and the others involved have put into the process. Respecting your commitment to the interview and the manager’s time is important. You risk burning a bridge with your recruiter, the hiring manager and the company. If you really must cancel, give adequate notice of at least 24-48 hours.

Every interview is an opportunity. Even if the job seems like it may not be your dream job, it is a chance to connect with a manager who shares your passion for the field. Show up on time, be prepared, and you might just leave with the perfect job.

Article by Tyler Pearl

The 15 Biggest Body Language Mistakes To Watch Out For

secrets-of-body-language

 

Until we get to know someone, our brain relies on snap judgements to try to categorize the person, predict what they will do, and anticipate how we should react. You may have heard that you only have a few seconds to make a first impression, but the truth is, your brain has made up its mind (so to speak) about a person within milliseconds of meeting them.

According to research done by a Princeton University psychologist, it’s an evolutionary survival mechanism. Your brain decides from the information it has—in other words, how you look—whether you are trustworthy, threatening, competent, likeable and many other traits.

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One way we can “hack” this split-second judgement is to be aware of our body language, especially in important situations. Whether you’re applying for a job, asking for a raise, or meeting with a new client, tweaking or just being mindful of our body language can influence the other person’s perception of us and the outcome of the situation.

15 Body language blunders to watch out for:

  1. Leaning Back too much — you come off lazy or arrogant.
  2. Leaning forward — can seem aggressive. Aim for a neutral posture.
  3. Breaking eye contact too soon — can make you seem untrustworthy or overly nervous. Hold eye contact a hair longer, especially during a handshake.
  4. Nodding too much — can make you look like a bobble head doll! Even if you agree with what’s being said, nod once and then try to remain still.
  5. Chopping or pointing with your hands — feels aggressive.
  6. Crossing your arms — makes you look defensive, especially when you’re answering questions. Try to keep your arms at your sides.
  7. Fidgeting — instantly telegraphs how nervous you are. Avoid it at all costs.
  8. Holding your hands behind your back (or firmly in your pockets) — can look rigid and stiff. Aim for a natural, hands at your sides posture.
  9. Looking up or looking around — is a natural cue that someone is lying or not being themselves. Try to hold steady eye contact.
  10. Staring — can be interpreted as aggressive. There’s a fine line between holding someone’s gaze and staring them down.
  11. Failing to smile — can make people uncomfortable, and wonder if you really want to be there. Go for a genuine smile especially when meeting someone for the first time.
  12. Stepping back when you’re asking for a decision — conveys fear or uncertainty. Stand your ground, or even take a slight step forward with conviction.
  13. Steepling your fingers or holding palms up — looks like a begging position and conveys weakness.
  14. Standing with hands on hips — is an aggressive posture, like a bird or a dog puffing themselves up to look bigger.
  15. Checking your phone or watch — says you want to be somewhere else. Plus, it’s just bad manners.

So, what should you do? Aim for good posture in a neutral position, whether sitting or standing. Stand with your arms at your sides, and sit with them at your sides or with your hands in your lap. Pay attention so that you naturally hold eye contact, smile, and be yourself.

If you discover you have a particular problem with one or two of the gestures on the list, practice by yourself with a mirror or with a friend who can remind you every time you do it, until you become aware of the bad habit yourself.

Can you recall a time someone’s body language made you uncomfortable? Are there any other body language blunders you would add? I’d love to hear your anecdotes and ideas in the comments below.

Written by: Bernard Marr | https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140707061900-64875646-the-15-biggest-body-language-mistakes-to-watch-out-for?trk=tod-home-art-list-small_3

I applied to the job I wanted… Why didn’t I hear back?

Posted on  by Tyler Pearl | http://www.daviscos.com/blog/applied-job-didnt-hear-back/#.U62ZbfldUWc

 

Frustrated

Applying for jobs can be extremely frustrating. You fill out the extensive form, attach a resume, hit submit… and then what? Wait, pray, apply again? Here are some reasons to answer the question “Why hasn’t anyone called me?”

1.  Too many people applied for the same job posting.

Lots of people apply
for every job posting out there. Sometimes there just are not enough hours in the day to review and call every applicant. Resumes can easily fall into the “black hole” and never be reviewed. One of our recently-posted jobs received 213 applicants. The position moved fast, and we did not get to call every applicant. On the bright side, the next time there is a similar opening, we now have your resume on file and are looking out for you.

2.  Your resume sucks.

Sorry, but if your resume is not well-organized, c
ontains misspellings, or is just too vague, the person reviewing your application may quickly pass. Other red flags are major gaps in employment, job hopping, or strange pieces of personal information. The job market is tight right now, and employers are looking for the best candidate. Finding the company that fits you best will be key.

For more advice on resume writing check out our blogger Galen’s advice.

3.  The job is no longer open.

Jobs close or stop accepting new applicants, but postings often stay up on Career pages for much longer. Other times, company policy dictates that every job is posted, but there is an internal promotion or inside candidate already taking an offer while you are just hitting submit.

My advice: Check when the job was posted. If it was 3 months ago, it might not be worth applying anymore. Subscribe to saved searches or watch your target job postings closely so you can beat the rush.

4.  It just might not be the right fit.

Look closely at the job description and title. Does it align well with your background and current position? Recruiters, HR representatives, and hiring managers don’t look at every resume for very long, so if you don’t quickly jump of the page and make them think, “This could be the one!”, you may not be getting the call.

5.  You live too far away.

Location is an important factor. One client recently lost a long-term employee because the commute finally became too much for him. They were worried that applicants who lived too far away may feel the same. Other times, we get applications from candidates all over the world. If you aren’t seriously planning to move and could not get to an interview within a few days, it probably isn’t the right job to apply for.

So what’s the best way to get a call from your application?

Talk with your recruiter and learn the best path to the job you want. We can be your best advocate during your search. We will work with you to optimize your resume and discuss how closely it fits. From inside information on company culture to the reason for the opening and the salary, we are here to help you. Developing a relationship with a recruiter over time will ensure that we think of you before we even post the job. A recent job we posted attracted 60 applicants, but the candidate who got the job had been talking to me since September and was the first call I made when the job came out.

As the saying goes, “It’s who you know, not what you know,” and in the job search, leverage who you know. Use LinkedIn and Networking groups. Meeting people in the company you want to work for is often the fastest way in the front door.

Lastly, don’t get frustrated. If you are applying to the right jobs and have the right strategy, you will find that dream job!