Press Release: Oshkosh Expansion

***FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***

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IQ Resource Group Expands Into Oshkosh Market

By: Crystal Redmann
April 29, 2015

Oshkosh, WI – IQ Resource Group is pleased to announce the opening of its newest branch office in Oshkosh, WI on April 27th, 2015.  The branch is located at 2211 Oregon Street, Suite A2, Oshkosh, WI 54901.  The phone number is (920) 235-1555.

“These are thrilling times for IQ Resource Group.” Explains Brad Ritchie, Vice President of IQ Resource Group. “We have expanded from our Appleton office as a result of tremendous growth over the past year in an effort to better meet the needs of our customers in this region.  Having a presence in Oshkosh will increase our candidate pool in this market and will allow us closer proximity to serve other neighboring communities”.

About Us
IQ Resource Group is a privately owned Wisconsin based recruiting firm, driven by a commitment to deliver quality solutions. We are a solutions provider of mid to high volume, skilled and semi-skilled contract personnel within the following areas:

  • Paper Production
  • Food Production
  • Light Technical / Skilled Trades

Since our inception, we have successfully united talent with opportunity. We’ve built our business on a commitment to unsurpassed industry knowledge, high performance and continual results. This success stems from quality recruiters, involvement in the community, willingness to go the extra mile for both employees and clients, and our ability to deliver the highest talent and match them with the best opportunities.

Clients and candidates prefer IQ Resource Group because we provide them with the personalized attention that can’t be found anywhere else. We have a proven track record of providing talented contractors who have the specific skills and experience necessary for the job, as well as the right personality for your organization.

Contact
To learn more about this expansion, please contact:
Brad Ritchie – Vice President
2211 Oregon Street, Suite A2
Oshkosh, WI 54902
P: 920-235-1555
F: 920-235-1586
bradr@iqresourcegroup.com

Apply Today! Submit a resume or complete an online application at https://iqresourcegroup.securedportals.com/apply/ or stop by our office at 2211 Oregon St.,  Suite A2, Oshkosh, WI to complete an application.

Common Nonverbal Mistakes Made at a Job Interview

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Body language is a powerful tool that should never be neglected.  As Ralph Waldo Emerson stated “What you do speaks so loud that I cannot hear what you say”.

Although a lot of focus is placed on the content of the interview, you should be aware of what your body language is saying at all times. Your professionalism should be communicated both verbally and nonverbally.

According to Classes and Careers, the most common verbal mistakes made during a job interview are the following:

 

1. Poor eye contact

Not making sufficient eye contact with your interviewer can be seen as a lack of interest in the job position. Conversely staring can be seen as aggressive and a little ‘creepy’.

Also ensure that your eye movements are not ‘shifty’, as this can signify a lack of confidence and uncertainty. Moreover, it is distracting to the interviewer.

ACTION: Make consistent and frequent eye contact, especially when the interviewer is talking to you. This conveys that you are actively listening.

 

2. Insufficient knowledge about the company

Not knowing enough about the company and the role that you are applying for is the second most common mistake seen by employers.

ACTION: Be prepared! Take the time to research the industry, the company and the people you will be meeting.

 

3. Not smiling

It is normal to be nervous during an interview, but don’t let your nerves override your smile. Remember that your positive attitude will be viral!

ACTION: Keep calm. Ensure that you come across as enthusiastic to be given an opportunity.

 

4. Poor posture

Posture can tell a lot about your overall demeanor, so present yourself well! Leaning back can be viewed as lazy, arrogant or as being uninterested in the discussion. Leaning too forward can be seen as aggressive. Slouching is a definite no-no, as this illustrates the height of laziness.

ACTION: Sit upright, keep your back straight and do not hunch. Beware of coming across like a stiff robot! You may lean forward slightly, to look as if you are fully engaged in the conversation.

 

5. Fidgeting

Fidgeting is a sign of nervous energy that can be distracting to the interviewer. You want the interview to focus on what you are saying and not your fidgeting.

ACTION: Make sure you are conscious of your hands at all times. Do not place your hands behind your back, as this will make you appear stiff.

 

6. Unusual handshake

A weak handshake can be sign as a sign of insecurity, while a strong handshake can be viewed as arrogant. Although it may seem irrelevant, an awkward handshake will leave a lasting impression on the interviewer.

ACTION: Your handshake should be firm. Improve it with practice!

 

7. Arms crossed over chest

Crossing your arms across your chest signals defensiveness and highlights your feelings of insecurity and uncertainty of your surroundings.

ACTION: Do not cross your arms! Keep your arms at the side of your chest and rest your hands loosely clasped on your lap. This will make you come across as more approachable.

 

8. Playing with hair or excessive use of hand gestures

As with fidgeting, these actions take away the attention from what you are saying.

ACTION: Be aware of your nervous ticks if you have any and keep hand gestures to a minimum. Do not over animate your hand gestures; you are not a cartoon character!

 

9. Bright color and odd attire are off-putting

Your choice of clothes can have a negative impact if they are not consistent with the position and company culture. You are not part of a circus act or on a night out, so do not dress accordingly.

ACTION: While maintaining your style, dress appropriately for the position, company or industry.

Made a Mistake? Own it.

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Hard as we try for perfection there is always that margin of human error.  As human beings it is inevitable that mistakes will be made from time to time.  However, I feel it is not always the mistake that should be judged but the steps taken after that are important.

When we are young we believe the rules don’t apply to us and that we are invincible.  It’s not until we grow up and get our first big reality check that we realize those rules do apply and we are vulnerable.  A choice I made years ago caught up with me in these last few weeks and, while everything turned out okay, it forced me to think of what I should have done differently and what I need to do going forward.

When we make mistakes, to shrug it off or take no responsibility will do you no good – especially on the job.  Sometimes it can seem that employers expect perfection, but for the most part they understand that mistakes will be made or details will be overlooked. If you believe that you are incapable of making a mistake, I am sorry to be the one to tell you that you’ve already made one. It is easy to give your employer an excuse or blame someone else to try and take the heat off of you.  To do nothing to correct or acknowledge the mistake will hurt you in the long run – not just in your job itself but with your co-workers  The minute you throw someone else “under the bus” to save yourself you will not only lose their respect but likely that of other co-workers as well (we all know how quickly word can get around).

So the next time you are confronted about a mistake, think about the situation and the right thing to say before blurting out what’s easiest. Mistakes are a part of life whether we like it or not but it’s what we learn from them that will help determine our future and how far we will go.

4 Reasons You Should Never Burn a Bridge with an Employer | Off The Cuff

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“You never know if you will have to cross that bridge again”

Have you ever had one of those work days where you feel under-appreciated, overworked, miserable or all of the above?  Maybe you took a job only to find out your manager was unethical or possibly even crazy!  Whatever category you fall under, you may have jumped to the solution of walking out with no warning or notice – just up and leave.

I’m sure that instant feeling of freedom is wonderful at first, but what happens next?  Do you have interviews lined up or other opportunities to pursue?  My guess is that this decision was in the moment and not a lot of thought went into the aftermath.

Having seen this situation unfold before, here are a few reasons why you should never burn your bridges.

  1. “Why did you leave your last position?”  Don’t be surprised if this question comes up during a phone screen or interview.  Hiring managers don’t typically offer jobs to candidates who bash their previous employer during an interview (regardless of the reason).  While you can answer professionally without badmouthing your old boss, it will be hard to prove you are a reliable candidate when you left your last job with no notice.
  2. References.  Many hiring managers ask for 2-3 professional references before making a formal offer.  Of the 2-3 they prefer at least one to be from your most recent hiring manager.  Even if you were completely professional in your reason for leaving, telling a hiring manager “Sorry, I won’t be able to get a reference from my last manager because I left without notice” probably won’t get you an offer.
  3. Networking.  Many job seekers put “references available upon request” at the bottom of their resumes, but some managers don’t always need to request one.  It is very possible that they have connections at a company you have previously worked for (especially if it is a direct competitor). Before they even decide to interview you, they will call their connection and get the scoop.  If you left on a bad note, I wouldn’t expect an interview.
  4. The Job Market.  Freedom feels great until you realize you have been unemployed for 2 months.  The job market has been tight these last few years and many have struggled to find the job they want.  While your reasons for leaving may be justifiable, leaving a job with nothing to fall back on is extremely risky.

As bad as your job may seem, try to stick it out until you can line up some interviews. Use your spare time outside of work to find new employment.  At the very least, you have a job with a paycheck and can leave on a good note.  Every situation is different, but in any case it is better to try to build a bridge, not burn it. You never know if you will have to cross that bridge again one day!