Referral Bonus!

Referral Bonus

Step 1: Refer a friend

Step 2: Receive a referral bonus

Step 3: Repeat steps 1 and 2!

 

If you know of someone you would like to recommend who is currently looking for employment please let us know by visiting the link below and you may be eligible for a referral bonus!

 

Referral Bonuswww.iqresourcegroup.com/candidate-referral/

 

 

 

 

Press Release: Oshkosh Expansion

***FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***

iqRG_Logo

IQ Resource Group Expands Into Oshkosh Market

By: Crystal Redmann
April 29, 2015

Oshkosh, WI – IQ Resource Group is pleased to announce the opening of its newest branch office in Oshkosh, WI on April 27th, 2015.  The branch is located at 2211 Oregon Street, Suite A2, Oshkosh, WI 54901.  The phone number is (920) 235-1555.

“These are thrilling times for IQ Resource Group.” Explains Brad Ritchie, Vice President of IQ Resource Group. “We have expanded from our Appleton office as a result of tremendous growth over the past year in an effort to better meet the needs of our customers in this region.  Having a presence in Oshkosh will increase our candidate pool in this market and will allow us closer proximity to serve other neighboring communities”.

About Us
IQ Resource Group is a privately owned Wisconsin based recruiting firm, driven by a commitment to deliver quality solutions. We are a solutions provider of mid to high volume, skilled and semi-skilled contract personnel within the following areas:

  • Paper Production
  • Food Production
  • Light Technical / Skilled Trades

Since our inception, we have successfully united talent with opportunity. We’ve built our business on a commitment to unsurpassed industry knowledge, high performance and continual results. This success stems from quality recruiters, involvement in the community, willingness to go the extra mile for both employees and clients, and our ability to deliver the highest talent and match them with the best opportunities.

Clients and candidates prefer IQ Resource Group because we provide them with the personalized attention that can’t be found anywhere else. We have a proven track record of providing talented contractors who have the specific skills and experience necessary for the job, as well as the right personality for your organization.

Contact
To learn more about this expansion, please contact:
Brad Ritchie – Vice President
2211 Oregon Street, Suite A2
Oshkosh, WI 54902
P: 920-235-1555
F: 920-235-1586
bradr@iqresourcegroup.com

Apply Today! Submit a resume or complete an online application at https://iqresourcegroup.securedportals.com/apply/ or stop by our office at 2211 Oregon St.,  Suite A2, Oshkosh, WI to complete an application.

Cancelling an Interview by Tyler Pearl

Getting an interview can be tough. Typically less than 30% of candidates who are submitted or apply for a position make it to the interview stage. It comes as a shock to the hiring manager and recruiter when they invite a great candidate to interview and he or she doesn’t show up or cancels 20 minutes before. As a candidate, maybe not every interview is the one, but there are ways to cancel and be professional at the same time.

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The interview is the best time to fully understand the job opportunity and feel out the relationship with the company. The hiring manager saw something in your resume that peeked interest and has set aside time in their busy day to meet with you. Your recruiter has also put a lot of work into setting up the interview for you and preparing you. You took the time to talk with the recruiter and learn about the job. So why would you cancel now?

I understand that things come up. Maybe a more appealing opportunity has presented itself. Maybe you aren’t feeling well. Or perhaps you had forgotten your schedule. If canceling even starts to cross your mind, consider what you and the others involved have put into the process. Respecting your commitment to the interview and the manager’s time is important. You risk burning a bridge with your recruiter, the hiring manager and the company. If you really must cancel, give adequate notice of at least 24-48 hours.

Every interview is an opportunity. Even if the job seems like it may not be your dream job, it is a chance to connect with a manager who shares your passion for the field. Show up on time, be prepared, and you might just leave with the perfect job.

Article by Tyler Pearl

Assemblers/Welders/Fabricators

 

Help build emergency vehicles that save lives. 

Save lives JobsAssemblers/Welders/Fabricators, Waupaca County

2nd shift -$14 to $15/hr, immediate openings!

Apply Today in our New London office

920-982-3660 www.iqresourcegroup.com

Job Fair! 8/14/2014

Low unemployment means opportunity in the Fox Valley

paconRecruting

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the unemployment rate is down to 6.1%, the lowest it’s been in the United States since 2008. That’s good news for the economy and good news for you. A strong hiring market is a huge advantage for jobseekers. Lower unemployment results in companies having to be more competitive for quality workers. Find a new job now with a great Fox Valley company with multiple positions open immediately.

IQ Resource Group is recruiting for immediate openings at Pacon Corporation

We are looking for candidates to fill the following positions below:

  • Converting Helpers
  • Roll Shafters
  • Material Handlers
  • Shipping
  • Hand Collating

Come and apply for your next opportunity.

  • Long-term positions with a possibility of hire-on
  • Experience in a manufacturing environment preferred but not necessary
  • Good attitudes and punctual people encouraged to apply!

 

Join us 8/14 for our 2014 JOB FAIR


9:00am – 12:00pm
Thursday, August 14
IQ Resource (Appleton Branch)
2277 W. Spencer St. • Appleton, WI

Common Nonverbal Mistakes Made at a Job Interview

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Click Picture to Enlarge

Body language is a powerful tool that should never be neglected.  As Ralph Waldo Emerson stated “What you do speaks so loud that I cannot hear what you say”.

Although a lot of focus is placed on the content of the interview, you should be aware of what your body language is saying at all times. Your professionalism should be communicated both verbally and nonverbally.

According to Classes and Careers, the most common verbal mistakes made during a job interview are the following:

 

1. Poor eye contact

Not making sufficient eye contact with your interviewer can be seen as a lack of interest in the job position. Conversely staring can be seen as aggressive and a little ‘creepy’.

Also ensure that your eye movements are not ‘shifty’, as this can signify a lack of confidence and uncertainty. Moreover, it is distracting to the interviewer.

ACTION: Make consistent and frequent eye contact, especially when the interviewer is talking to you. This conveys that you are actively listening.

 

2. Insufficient knowledge about the company

Not knowing enough about the company and the role that you are applying for is the second most common mistake seen by employers.

ACTION: Be prepared! Take the time to research the industry, the company and the people you will be meeting.

 

3. Not smiling

It is normal to be nervous during an interview, but don’t let your nerves override your smile. Remember that your positive attitude will be viral!

ACTION: Keep calm. Ensure that you come across as enthusiastic to be given an opportunity.

 

4. Poor posture

Posture can tell a lot about your overall demeanor, so present yourself well! Leaning back can be viewed as lazy, arrogant or as being uninterested in the discussion. Leaning too forward can be seen as aggressive. Slouching is a definite no-no, as this illustrates the height of laziness.

ACTION: Sit upright, keep your back straight and do not hunch. Beware of coming across like a stiff robot! You may lean forward slightly, to look as if you are fully engaged in the conversation.

 

5. Fidgeting

Fidgeting is a sign of nervous energy that can be distracting to the interviewer. You want the interview to focus on what you are saying and not your fidgeting.

ACTION: Make sure you are conscious of your hands at all times. Do not place your hands behind your back, as this will make you appear stiff.

 

6. Unusual handshake

A weak handshake can be sign as a sign of insecurity, while a strong handshake can be viewed as arrogant. Although it may seem irrelevant, an awkward handshake will leave a lasting impression on the interviewer.

ACTION: Your handshake should be firm. Improve it with practice!

 

7. Arms crossed over chest

Crossing your arms across your chest signals defensiveness and highlights your feelings of insecurity and uncertainty of your surroundings.

ACTION: Do not cross your arms! Keep your arms at the side of your chest and rest your hands loosely clasped on your lap. This will make you come across as more approachable.

 

8. Playing with hair or excessive use of hand gestures

As with fidgeting, these actions take away the attention from what you are saying.

ACTION: Be aware of your nervous ticks if you have any and keep hand gestures to a minimum. Do not over animate your hand gestures; you are not a cartoon character!

 

9. Bright color and odd attire are off-putting

Your choice of clothes can have a negative impact if they are not consistent with the position and company culture. You are not part of a circus act or on a night out, so do not dress accordingly.

ACTION: While maintaining your style, dress appropriately for the position, company or industry.

Canceling an Interview – The Last Resort

Interview-Cancel-Featured

Getting an interview can be tough. Typically less than 30% of candidates who are submitted or apply for a position make it to the interview stage. It comes as a shock to the hiring manager and recruiter when they invite a great candidate to interview and he or she doesn’t show up or cancels 20 minutes before. As a candidate, maybe not every interview is the one, but there are ways to cancel and be professional at the same time.

The interview is the best time to fully understand the job opportunity and feel out the relationship with the company. The hiring manager saw something in your resume that peeked interest and has set aside time in their busy day to meet with you. Your recruiter has also put a lot of work into setting up the interview for you and preparing you. You took the time to talk with the recruiter and learn about the job. So why would you cancel now?

I understand that things come up. Maybe a more appealing opportunity has presented itself. Maybe you aren’t feeling well. Or perhaps you had forgotten your schedule. If canceling even starts to cross your mind, consider what you and the others involved have put into the process. Respecting your commitment to the interview and the manager’s time is important. You risk burning a bridge with your recruiter, the hiring manager and the company. If you really must cancel, give adequate notice of at least 24-48 hours.

Every interview is an opportunity. Even if the job seems like it may not be your dream job, it is an chance to connect with a manager who shares your passion for the field. Show up on time, be prepared, and whatever you do, don’t do this!

 

4 Reasons You Should Never Burn a Bridge with an Employer | Off The Cuff

burning-bridge

“You never know if you will have to cross that bridge again”

Have you ever had one of those work days where you feel under-appreciated, overworked, miserable or all of the above?  Maybe you took a job only to find out your manager was unethical or possibly even crazy!  Whatever category you fall under, you may have jumped to the solution of walking out with no warning or notice – just up and leave.

I’m sure that instant feeling of freedom is wonderful at first, but what happens next?  Do you have interviews lined up or other opportunities to pursue?  My guess is that this decision was in the moment and not a lot of thought went into the aftermath.

Having seen this situation unfold before, here are a few reasons why you should never burn your bridges.

  1. “Why did you leave your last position?”  Don’t be surprised if this question comes up during a phone screen or interview.  Hiring managers don’t typically offer jobs to candidates who bash their previous employer during an interview (regardless of the reason).  While you can answer professionally without badmouthing your old boss, it will be hard to prove you are a reliable candidate when you left your last job with no notice.
  2. References.  Many hiring managers ask for 2-3 professional references before making a formal offer.  Of the 2-3 they prefer at least one to be from your most recent hiring manager.  Even if you were completely professional in your reason for leaving, telling a hiring manager “Sorry, I won’t be able to get a reference from my last manager because I left without notice” probably won’t get you an offer.
  3. Networking.  Many job seekers put “references available upon request” at the bottom of their resumes, but some managers don’t always need to request one.  It is very possible that they have connections at a company you have previously worked for (especially if it is a direct competitor). Before they even decide to interview you, they will call their connection and get the scoop.  If you left on a bad note, I wouldn’t expect an interview.
  4. The Job Market.  Freedom feels great until you realize you have been unemployed for 2 months.  The job market has been tight these last few years and many have struggled to find the job they want.  While your reasons for leaving may be justifiable, leaving a job with nothing to fall back on is extremely risky.

As bad as your job may seem, try to stick it out until you can line up some interviews. Use your spare time outside of work to find new employment.  At the very least, you have a job with a paycheck and can leave on a good note.  Every situation is different, but in any case it is better to try to build a bridge, not burn it. You never know if you will have to cross that bridge again one day!

The 15 Biggest Body Language Mistakes To Watch Out For

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Until we get to know someone, our brain relies on snap judgements to try to categorize the person, predict what they will do, and anticipate how we should react. You may have heard that you only have a few seconds to make a first impression, but the truth is, your brain has made up its mind (so to speak) about a person within milliseconds of meeting them.

According to research done by a Princeton University psychologist, it’s an evolutionary survival mechanism. Your brain decides from the information it has—in other words, how you look—whether you are trustworthy, threatening, competent, likeable and many other traits.

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One way we can “hack” this split-second judgement is to be aware of our body language, especially in important situations. Whether you’re applying for a job, asking for a raise, or meeting with a new client, tweaking or just being mindful of our body language can influence the other person’s perception of us and the outcome of the situation.

15 Body language blunders to watch out for:

  1. Leaning Back too much — you come off lazy or arrogant.
  2. Leaning forward — can seem aggressive. Aim for a neutral posture.
  3. Breaking eye contact too soon — can make you seem untrustworthy or overly nervous. Hold eye contact a hair longer, especially during a handshake.
  4. Nodding too much — can make you look like a bobble head doll! Even if you agree with what’s being said, nod once and then try to remain still.
  5. Chopping or pointing with your hands — feels aggressive.
  6. Crossing your arms — makes you look defensive, especially when you’re answering questions. Try to keep your arms at your sides.
  7. Fidgeting — instantly telegraphs how nervous you are. Avoid it at all costs.
  8. Holding your hands behind your back (or firmly in your pockets) — can look rigid and stiff. Aim for a natural, hands at your sides posture.
  9. Looking up or looking around — is a natural cue that someone is lying or not being themselves. Try to hold steady eye contact.
  10. Staring — can be interpreted as aggressive. There’s a fine line between holding someone’s gaze and staring them down.
  11. Failing to smile — can make people uncomfortable, and wonder if you really want to be there. Go for a genuine smile especially when meeting someone for the first time.
  12. Stepping back when you’re asking for a decision — conveys fear or uncertainty. Stand your ground, or even take a slight step forward with conviction.
  13. Steepling your fingers or holding palms up — looks like a begging position and conveys weakness.
  14. Standing with hands on hips — is an aggressive posture, like a bird or a dog puffing themselves up to look bigger.
  15. Checking your phone or watch — says you want to be somewhere else. Plus, it’s just bad manners.

So, what should you do? Aim for good posture in a neutral position, whether sitting or standing. Stand with your arms at your sides, and sit with them at your sides or with your hands in your lap. Pay attention so that you naturally hold eye contact, smile, and be yourself.

If you discover you have a particular problem with one or two of the gestures on the list, practice by yourself with a mirror or with a friend who can remind you every time you do it, until you become aware of the bad habit yourself.

Can you recall a time someone’s body language made you uncomfortable? Are there any other body language blunders you would add? I’d love to hear your anecdotes and ideas in the comments below.

Written by: Bernard Marr | https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140707061900-64875646-the-15-biggest-body-language-mistakes-to-watch-out-for?trk=tod-home-art-list-small_3