Cancelling an Interview by Tyler Pearl

Getting an interview can be tough. Typically less than 30% of candidates who are submitted or apply for a position make it to the interview stage. It comes as a shock to the hiring manager and recruiter when they invite a great candidate to interview and he or she doesn’t show up or cancels 20 minutes before. As a candidate, maybe not every interview is the one, but there are ways to cancel and be professional at the same time.

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The interview is the best time to fully understand the job opportunity and feel out the relationship with the company. The hiring manager saw something in your resume that peeked interest and has set aside time in their busy day to meet with you. Your recruiter has also put a lot of work into setting up the interview for you and preparing you. You took the time to talk with the recruiter and learn about the job. So why would you cancel now?

I understand that things come up. Maybe a more appealing opportunity has presented itself. Maybe you aren’t feeling well. Or perhaps you had forgotten your schedule. If canceling even starts to cross your mind, consider what you and the others involved have put into the process. Respecting your commitment to the interview and the manager’s time is important. You risk burning a bridge with your recruiter, the hiring manager and the company. If you really must cancel, give adequate notice of at least 24-48 hours.

Every interview is an opportunity. Even if the job seems like it may not be your dream job, it is a chance to connect with a manager who shares your passion for the field. Show up on time, be prepared, and you might just leave with the perfect job.

Article by Tyler Pearl

Immediate Openings (Waupaca County)

 

Assemblers/Welders/Fabricators, Waupaca CountyWelders Jobs

Assemblers/Welders/Fabricators, Waupaca County

2nd shift -$14 to $15/hr, immediate openings!
Apply Today in our New London office 920-982-3660 www.iqresourcegroup.com

Assemblers/Welders/Fabricators

 

Help build emergency vehicles that save lives. 

Save lives JobsAssemblers/Welders/Fabricators, Waupaca County

2nd shift -$14 to $15/hr, immediate openings!

Apply Today in our New London office

920-982-3660 www.iqresourcegroup.com

Janitorial Positions Available Immediately!

Current OpeningsIQ Resource Group has several full and part-time janitorial opportunities throughout Northeast Wisconsin!  

 

We are looking for qualified individuals to fill these needs immediately!

To apply go to https://iqresourcegroup.securedportals.com/apply/

2nd Shift Openings:
Full-time Floater: Fox Valley and Neenah/Menasha/Oshkosh   $10/hr.
Full-time Cleaner: Fox Valley    $8.50/hr.
Part-time Cleaner: Fox Valley      $8.50/hr.
Full-time Floors: Fox Valley     $9-10/hr. (depending on experience with floor cleaning)
Full-time Lead: Denmark      Experience based
Part-time Cleaner: New London/Waupaca      $8.50/hr.
Part-time Weekend Cleaner: Kaukauna    $10+/hr.
Full and Part-time Cleaner: Wrightstown    $8.50/hr.
Part-time Shop Assistant      $10/hr.
Part-time Cleaner: Medford    $9/hr.
 
3rd Shift Opening:
Full-time Cleaner: Neenah   $9/hr.
 

Made a Mistake? Own it.

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Hard as we try for perfection there is always that margin of human error.  As human beings it is inevitable that mistakes will be made from time to time.  However, I feel it is not always the mistake that should be judged but the steps taken after that are important.

When we are young we believe the rules don’t apply to us and that we are invincible.  It’s not until we grow up and get our first big reality check that we realize those rules do apply and we are vulnerable.  A choice I made years ago caught up with me in these last few weeks and, while everything turned out okay, it forced me to think of what I should have done differently and what I need to do going forward.

When we make mistakes, to shrug it off or take no responsibility will do you no good – especially on the job.  Sometimes it can seem that employers expect perfection, but for the most part they understand that mistakes will be made or details will be overlooked. If you believe that you are incapable of making a mistake, I am sorry to be the one to tell you that you’ve already made one. It is easy to give your employer an excuse or blame someone else to try and take the heat off of you.  To do nothing to correct or acknowledge the mistake will hurt you in the long run – not just in your job itself but with your co-workers  The minute you throw someone else “under the bus” to save yourself you will not only lose their respect but likely that of other co-workers as well (we all know how quickly word can get around).

So the next time you are confronted about a mistake, think about the situation and the right thing to say before blurting out what’s easiest. Mistakes are a part of life whether we like it or not but it’s what we learn from them that will help determine our future and how far we will go.

Canceling an Interview – The Last Resort

Interview-Cancel-Featured

Getting an interview can be tough. Typically less than 30% of candidates who are submitted or apply for a position make it to the interview stage. It comes as a shock to the hiring manager and recruiter when they invite a great candidate to interview and he or she doesn’t show up or cancels 20 minutes before. As a candidate, maybe not every interview is the one, but there are ways to cancel and be professional at the same time.

The interview is the best time to fully understand the job opportunity and feel out the relationship with the company. The hiring manager saw something in your resume that peeked interest and has set aside time in their busy day to meet with you. Your recruiter has also put a lot of work into setting up the interview for you and preparing you. You took the time to talk with the recruiter and learn about the job. So why would you cancel now?

I understand that things come up. Maybe a more appealing opportunity has presented itself. Maybe you aren’t feeling well. Or perhaps you had forgotten your schedule. If canceling even starts to cross your mind, consider what you and the others involved have put into the process. Respecting your commitment to the interview and the manager’s time is important. You risk burning a bridge with your recruiter, the hiring manager and the company. If you really must cancel, give adequate notice of at least 24-48 hours.

Every interview is an opportunity. Even if the job seems like it may not be your dream job, it is an chance to connect with a manager who shares your passion for the field. Show up on time, be prepared, and whatever you do, don’t do this!

 

How To Stay Off Our Blacklist (AKA “Do Not Assign”) | Staffing Talk

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Written by Scott Morefield February 19, 2014 – See more at: http://staffingtalk.com/how-to-stay-off-our-blacklist-aka-do-not-assign/#sthash.a9uOwlYH.dpuf

Whether you’re between jobs, looking for a better job, or just starting out in this wild, wacky adventure we call work, staffing firms can be an excellent tool to have at your disposal. Since our business model demands that we actually put people to work in order to keep our doors open, if we see even a little effort and promise on your end we’ll often go the extra mile on ours to land you a job.

We don’t think we’re asking for much – just a polite, friendly demeanor, neat appearance, decent work history, reachable references, a can-do spirit, and maybe a nice handshake and a look in the eye to top it all off (OK, we’ll even make the handshake and eye contact optional!). When you step through our doors, we WANT to put you to work and, once employed, we want to keep working you until you land a full-time gig, hopefully at one of our clients. In the business world, that’s what I call a win-win.

That is, as long as you manage to stay off of our DNA list.

What sort of nefarious list is this, you ask?

Well, in the staffing world, DNA doesn’t have anything to do with your genes (calm down, Legal Beagle, we know the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act prohibits us from asking those questions!). Rather, DNA stands for ‘do not assign.’ Other staffing companies might use different abbreviations and terminologies, but they all have some sort of ‘blacklist’ in the form of a system designation to mark those to whom the privilege of job offers will no longer be extended. Once your name makes it there, you might as well ditch your phone and change your address to some kulak in Siberia, because as far as we’re concerned you’re banished and we aren’t calling you again, ever.

So, how do you avoid landing on this awful list? I’m glad you asked! How about a list of five surefire ways to land ON the DNA list? Avoid doing these, and your chances of avoiding ‘the list’ are pretty good.

1.) Violence – You’d think this should go without saying, but in today’s climate one can never be too cautious. That’s why not only the actual act of violence (or harassment, or intimidation, or bullying, or anything that could possibly be related to those things!), but even the vaguest, most remote threat of violence of any sort will not only get you released from your assignment, but will get you permanently and irrevocably DNA’d. It’s just not worth the risk.

2.) No call, no show – If you’re going to take the time to register, interview, drug test, watch orientation videos, and fill out the seemingly endless reams of paperwork required to work with us, one would think that actually physically showing up for the job you accepted on day one would be just a formality, right? Sadly, this isn’t always the case. When we tell our client you’re going to be there, and you aren’t there… unless you’ve called us with a really good reason, consider yourself DNA’d.

3.) ‘Walk off’ a job – No matter how well we try to explain the job to you, nothing can quite equal actually DOING the job. Maybe packing corn chips in cardboard boxes all day sounded more glamorous than it actually turned out to be. Maybe you thought we said ‘tasting pies’ when we actually said ‘tool & die.’ I don’t know, but I do know that if you walk off a job before your shift is complete we will never, ever place you again.

4.) Violate a safety rule – This was an important piece of my article entitled, ‘How To Get Fired On Your First Day As A Temp.’ For the same reasons listed there, violating a safety rule will also land you on our DNA list, from which no further placements will ever, ever ensue.

5.) Lie to us – Whether it’s fudging your resume, failing to disclose a criminal past, or using your THIRD dead grandmother as an excuse for calling out of work, we have a really hard time placing people who we can’t trust. Can you blame us?

There are certainly more, but these are probably the worst offenders. No big deal, you might think. List or no list, you’ll just land a job on your own. Maybe so, but keep in mind that when you are on a staffing company’s DNA list you’ve often barred yourself not just from that staffing company, but from the dozens of clients that staffing company does business with. And although these days sharing references, especially bad ones, is taboo among the HR world, you’re deceiving yourself if you don’t think people who know and network with each other will talk ‘off the record.’ Trust me, other than the ‘Busted’ section of the newspaper or maybe the ‘bad check’ wall at Shoney’s, the DNA list of any staffing company is the worst place your name can appear.

– See more at: http://staffingtalk.com/how-to-stay-off-our-blacklist-aka-do-not-assign/#sthash.thoKz4V5.dpuf